Re: lightweight access to large data structures?




thank you for all the advice. I solved my problem in a pragmatic but
not convenient way. I now have only one hash that combines both keys
into one key, and which points to an index into one long string which
contains all the data. This seems rather memory efficient, even
though it is not convenient and not in the spirit of my problem.
better than an external data base, external C, or other kludges,
however...

/iaw

.



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